“Homecoming Horrors”

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The article “Homecoming Horrors” appeared in the 24 October 2013 edition of the free street magazine for men, Shortlist.

The cover art was striking: banking on a photographic mixture of meaningful reality and “Call Of Duty*” type imagery, it brought attention to an article doing justice to the psychological and physical damages that returning war veterans endure.

It successfully raised the problematic lack of awareness _and funding_ towards resolving the plight of the irreparably wounded.

Shamefully, I have sometimes branded charities as hypocritical and self-serving endeavours until this smacked me squarely in the face: charities at least keep us aware of the unresolved problems festering under the surface of economic stability. More so when there’s no money.

It seems Syria, Tibet and other world conflicts are indeed biting us all in the arse. As government lacks (or diverts) the funding meant for humanitarian causes, the “plagues” slowly filter back into our stupidly cosy first world in a variety of forms. Each one harder to remedy as time goes by. The antiseptic portion of our taxes isn’t there to assist all abuse or war victims. So, charities, regardless of how efficient, are a necessary and humane relief.

Parallel to plotting to do something charitable myself, there was the immediate and plainly observable irony: war isn’t like in the books, 3D games or movies. Ridiculous make-believe…

There must be something to “the Duty” that breaks hard-core men and women from the inside out.

Now, to bring this post to the extreme:
Don’t answer that call… and parallel to that, paying to be scar(r)ed while cosily eating pop-corn is disrespectful and ultimately, detrimental. Do yourself a favour, invest that “reality TV” or scary movie money to help those living in buried horrors.

* “Call Of Duty” is a 3D game even I know about… due to be released in the UK on the 5 November.
* Despite working in the charity higher education sector, and thereby having a healthy conscience, this post was difficult to write… almost as tough as reading the article.
[Image Source.]

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